Dear soldier: Laurel Oak first graders write holiday letters to troops

Dear soldier...

Children write letters to troops overseas.

A student in Dana Wexler's first-grade class at Laurel Oak Elementary School shows off the holiday letter she wrote and colored for a soldier serving overseas.

Photo by JAY SCHLICHTER

A student in Dana Wexler's first-grade class at Laurel Oak Elementary School shows off the holiday letter she wrote and colored for a soldier serving overseas.

Soldiers, sailors and airmen serving overseas often feel homesick and lonely, especially during the holidays.

Dana Wexley’s first-grade class at Laurel Oak Elementary School in North Naples sought to help a few of those heroes feel a little joy from home. Her students, ages 6 and 7, wrote touching letters to the troops, thanking them for “keeping us safe,” “protecting the world,” and wishing them “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays.”

“We know that they’re not able to be with their families and we know that what they do is extremely important, so we decided to write them holiday letters,” Wexler said.

Their letters included cute drawings of everything from the to-be-expected Santa Claus to the less-expected-but-no-less-cute Batman and Superman. They also colored and cut out designs for special snowflakes that will fall out onto the soldiers’ laps when they open their letters.

Several of the students had close family connections to servicemen and women currently stationed overseas, so many of the letters will be sent directly to them. One of those soldiers is Jay Yazel, a sergeant in the First Infantry Division based in Fort Riley, Kan.

“It’s something that we felt would do them honor and do us justice and make us feel really good,” Wexler said.

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Comments » 1

Robertofnaples writes:

When I was activated for Desert Storm, (seems like a million years ago)I received letters from local Children, thanking me and asking many questions. It really touched me. I explained the daily routine of preparing for the upcoming invasion in terms I hoped they understood. Then I played a joke on them. I would say now I will answer your questions. Yes, yes, maybe, and I'm not sure.When I came home I visited the class and thanked them. They all said they laughed at my answered. I'm thinking it was the Teachers delivery, more than my joke.

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